National Justice Museum announce sponsorship deal

Midlands based Accountancy and Business Advisory firm, Smith Cooper, has struck up a sponsorship deal with Nottingham’s multi award-winning charity, the National Justice Museum.

The sponsorship will see the Grand Jury Room, a 19th Century room available to hire for conferences, seminars, formal dinners and more, rebranded as the Smith Cooper Grand Jury Room.

The National Justice Museum is an independent charity and a long-standing client of Smith Cooper. The sponsorship marks the amalgamation of two distinctive businesses based in the heart of Nottingham’s thriving economy.

The Grade II listed building that houses the National Justice Museum is located in Nottingham’s historic Lace Market. Inspiring people of all ages to become active citizens, the museum offers engaging activities, exhibitions and educational programmes relating to law and justice for all ages. It also offers a dramatic setting for a range of bespoke events, from weddings and conferences, to sleepovers and paranormal investigations.

Sarah Flear, Partner at Smith Cooper comments: “The National Justice Museum has been a client of ours for many years, so we are delighted to support the charity and preserve the longevity of our relationship. We are passionate about the local community, and committed to nurturing relationships with our clients across the Midlands.

She continues: “The magnificent, 19th century Smith Cooper Grand Jury Room provides an inspiring location for a host of occasions, and we are really proud to be sponsoring the Museum. We hope this sets the precedent for future sponsorships.”

Nicola Burley, Interim Chief Operating Officer of the National Justice Museum adds: “We are very grateful of the sponsorship that Smith Cooper have provided for our Grand Jury Room. Smith Cooper have established a fantastic reputation in the local marketplace, and having worked with experts from Smith Cooper for many years, we know how professional the organisation is. That is something we are proud to be associated with.”

She continues: “Thanks to the support of local businesses such as Smith Cooper, we are able to continue inspiring people to learn about the fascinating history of law and justice.”

The National Justice Museum is an independent charity and does not receive any core funding from government or local authorities. It relies entirely on the support of the visitors, trusts and other companies.